Warren and Jane Davis Memorial Dare Math/Science Scholarship Stokes College-Bound Students’ Dreams

Warren Davis was born in 1920, a time when cars and lightbulbs were still fairly new inventions. The ‘war to end all wars’ was over, the economy was strong, spirits were high, and the latest fads and fashions were causing an uproar. He grew up in a time when family, church, God, and country were the focus of the large majority of Americans. Warren ultimately and selflessly devoted his life to serving others, and he was passionate about education, children, and lifting others up. He created the Dare Math/Science Scholarship Fund so that his passion for education would continue to be felt for many, many generations to come. Every year, renewable scholarships will be awarded from this fund to Dare County students pursuing math and science-related college degrees.

Warren grew up in Muskogee, Oklahoma, and was nine when the Great Depression gripped the nation. He survived by “eating applesauce sandwiches;” he was a gifted student and skipped enough grades to enter college at age 16. Warren graduated with an engineering degree in 1940. His first post-college job, with Gulf Oil Company in 1941, was cut short when he joined the Mighty 8th Air Force in Britain in 1942. Under his leadership (he was captain of the 493rd Bomb Group’s ground crew) and abetted by his problem-solving skillsets, his squadron was recognized with the Bronze Star for their ability to put together damaged B-17 bombers.

Back at home, he returned to Gulf Oil, where he enjoyed a successful career that spanned more than four decades. Hired as an entry-level engineer, he retired from Gulf Oil in 1983 as their Chief Economist. In the 70’s, Harvard University enlisted Warren’s help to rewrite petroleum industry case studies. The world was his oyster.

Warren and his bride, Jane, raised four children, and they instilled a strong sense of duty in each of them. Both parents volunteered for the athletic and civic programs Beth, Jan, Connie, and Jim entered in to, and served as starters, umpires, boosters, and “the best Girl Scout leader any girl could ever have.” Warren and Jane instilled philanthropy young in life by providing allowance and encouraging their children to give a little of that precious weekly spending money to their church.

Warren and Jane moved to the Outer Banks after “retirement,” where they wasted no time becoming heavily involved in church and local charitable efforts. Logging 10,000 volunteer hours at one nonprofit alone, Warren boosted many local organizations, including Outer Banks Hotline, College of the Albemarle (COA), Dare Literacy Association, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, and Outer Banks Forum.

Warren was particularly keen on tutoring children and young adults, and drove to Elizabeth City every Friday morning from 1987 to 2000 to tutor students in math and English at COA. He continued tutoring locally well into his nineties.

The Dare Math/Science Scholarship fund was established at the Community Foundation in 1991 with an initial gift of $12,500. The first $1,000 scholarship was awarded in 1994; since then, more than $35,000 in scholarships, many for four years, have been awarded.

Caroline Lowcher, one of the Davis scholarship recipients, wrote, “The Dare Math/Science scholarship assisted me in obtaining bachelor’s degrees in Applied Mathematics and Oceanography. These were crucial stepping stones on my path of higher education and setting me up for a successful career. As a female in STEM fields I am a minority, so to have the support of this scholarship encouraged me to pursue male-dominated fields. Supporting minorities and including women in STEM fields is a national mission of multiple federal science agencies, so it is great to see that transpire on a local level in our community.”

Caroline Lowcher

Caroline is currently pursuing her PhD in Physical Oceanography from Scripps Institution of Oceanography and is studying to become an observational oceanographer, making measurements of the ocean, and using math, physics, high-quality research, and scientific analysis to understand the circulation in the coastal ocean.

The name of this scholarship fund has been changed to the Warren and Jane Davis Memorial Dare Math/Science Scholarship, to honor a request by the Davis children to memorialize their parents. The fund is endowed, meaning that the principal is invested and only 5% of the fund balance is expended in any given period. Endowments are structured to last forever, to benefit the community and stand as lasting legacies for their founders.

Anyone can make a gift to this fund, or any of the more than 200 funds held at the Community Foundation, by going to obcf.org/donate and searching by fund name in the drop-down list.

Anyone can create and name a scholarship fund at Outer Banks Community Foundation; it costs as little $1,000 to get started; as long as the fund balance is grown to $5,000 within three years. Call or email us to get started.

For as long as Dare County children yearn for higher education in math and science fields, the Warren and Jane Davis Memorial Dare Math/Science Scholarship will be here to serve them.

Community Foundation 2022 Annual Meeting Recap

Community Foundation Honors Sheila Davies, Elects New Board Members, and Celebrates 40 Years at Annual Meeting

The Outer Banks Community Foundation held its annual meeting virtually via zoom on February 22. Three new board members were elected by Community Foundation membership, and two departing board members were thanked and recognized. Sheila Davies, Director of the Dare County Department of Health and Human Services and Public Health Director, was named as the Community Foundation’s 2021 Champion for her exemplary service and dedication to the Outer Banks in compassionately leading our community during a pandemic and beyond.

“In my 20 plus years living on Outer Banks, I’ve been continually impressed by the loving and giving nature of the people here,” said Dr. Davies. “Time and time again, when needs arise, the Outer Banks Community Foundation, area nonprofits, businesses, government, and citizens step up and create solutions. Congratulations and thank you to the Outer Banks Community Foundation for 40 years of remarkable service and giving to our community.”

Betty Govan Selby, Mayor Pro Tem for the Town of Manteo and Northeastern NC Regional Coordinator for Advance NC; Ray Meiggs of Southern Shores, former Executive Director of both the Arts of the Albemarle and the Whalehead Preservation Trust, and Twiddy & Company real estate executive; and Claudia Neall of Nags Head, a Senior Foreign Language Interpreter with Dare County Department of Health & Human Services and former Director of Mano al Hermano were unanimously elected by Community Foundation membership to serve as at-large board members.

Two retiring board members were thanked for their outstanding service: Jane Webster of Kitty Hawk, who served as the Community Foundation’s Vice Chair in 2020 and 2021 and Grants Chair from 2019 – 2021; and Nancy Caviness of Duck, who served as an at-large board member from 2017 – 2021, including as Scholarship Committee Co-Chair from 2018 – 2021.

In 2021, grants and disbursements went to the community through donor-advised funds ($190,656), organization and designated funds ($169,467), scholarships ($174,900) Community Enrichment and Focus grants ($207,896), and disaster grants ($146,300).

The meeting included a special video honoring Community Foundation founders and Emeritus board members from 1982 to today and celebrating more than 200 funds established and $12 million in grants and scholarships awarded since the Community Foundation began. The seven-minute video, produced by Twiddy & Company, can be seen on the Community Foundation’s website and YouTube page.

Community Foundation President and CEO Chris Sawin acknowledged contributions of talent over the years, starting with Founder David Stick and founding board members Andy Griffith, Edward Greene, Jack Adams, Martin Kellogg, Cashar Evans, Jr., and Ray White, expressing gratitude to them for creating a charity whereby current and future generations can ‘put something back’ for the betterment of all.

Community Foundation Board Chair Clark Twiddy closed the meeting by saying, “We hope to inspire personal generosity; work on behalf of our donors and community on governance, sustainability, and good stewardship of assets; and to create meaningful impact through grants and scholarships, as well as through our full engagement in our communities.”

The Outer Banks Community Foundation is a 501(c)3 nonprofit charitable organization that connects people who care with causes that matter. Based in a historic flat top cottage in Southern Shores, the Community Foundation manages $25 million across more than 200 charitable funds for individuals and agencies, awards grants to nonprofits, administers 60 scholarship programs, and provides tailored services to help donors pursue their charitable interests. Since its inception in 1982, the Community Foundation has awarded more than $12 million in grants and scholarships to local nonprofits and students.

 

The Outer Banks Community Foundation wishes to thank

– Miles Daniels and Ben Wiener of Twiddy & Company, for producing our 40th Anniversary video

– Twiddy and Company for donating space and technology for our Annual Meeting live stream

– Katy Spore for creating our 40th Anniversary artwork

– Hilton Garden Inn for their use of the Kitty Hawk Fishing Pier for video interviews

– Barb Noel for program layout and design assistance

– Interviewees, speakers, and on-camera – Jack Adams, Pastor Ivey Belch, Lorelei Costa, Jean-Louise Dixon, Cashar Evans, Adrianna Noel Goodwin, Daniel Palacios-Ibarra, Mike Kelly, Alicia Peele, Litzy Velazquez Tovar, and Jane Webster

– Brett Barley for storm video footage

– Daniel Pullen and Outer Banks History Center, Drew C. Wilson Photograph Collection, for use of images

 

2022 Virtual Annual Meeting is 2.22.22

 

The Outer Banks Community Foundation Board of Directors cordially invites you to attend its 2022 virtual Annual Meeting on Tuesday, February 22 at noon.

We’ll celebrate 2021 community champions and outgoing board members, elect 2022 board members, and acknowledge 40 years of growing and giving, thanks to tireless, talented founders and decades of generous donors & volunteers, through a grateful Community Foundation, to hundreds of nonprofits here at home and throughout the US.

 

We hope you’ll join us virtually this year. Register for the virtual event via the button below

 

 

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Thank you! We look forward with pleasure to your participation.

 

Scholarship Recipient Katy Spore on Being Bold and Going for Gold

Community Foundation scholarship recipient and First Flight High School 2017 grad Katy Spore is only recently out of college; she is already immersed in big city life and a career in her chosen profession. She’s designing at THINX, an eCommerce company in New York City; designing for others, as time allows; and taking a big bite out of life and The Big Apple. Community Foundation staff loved her design work so much that she was commissioned to create the 40th anniversary logo and graphic.

Katy was helped through four years of higher education at NC State by several scholarships, including the Glenn & Pat Eure Scholarship for Arts Education, and Linda Porter’s Shear Genius Scholarship, which are managed by your Community Foundation.

“What I like most about my job, and designing in general, is the creative process,” Katy wrote. “I love when there is just time to explore and experiment…you can end up with results you may have not thought of if you hadn’t played around.”

“My college education helped me achieve my goals by connecting me to my creative network of classmates and professors,” Katy continued. “My design school experience helped prepare me for real world feedback on my designs and how to carry myself professionally. The scholarships I received from Outer Banks Community Foundation and others allowed me to enter these environments and make connections that will last a lifetime.”

Katy’s advice for high school seniors? “Take time to figure out what activities or places make you feel most yourself. As long as you feel like you are growing in the environment you are in, it’s probably a good choice. Also, your college career will probably not be linear. There will be unexpected turns and ups and downs you cannot account for. But the coolest part is, when you finish college and will not recognize that person you were in your senior year of high school. That is the part that makes college, or any other personal growth journey, worth it.”

High school seniors and parents: our scholarship application season extends through Monday, March 7. Approximately $200,000 in scholarships will be awarded this year from your Community Foundation! To make sure you are one of this year’s recipients, don’t delay; get started today! Follow this link to get started.

Click on Katy’s beautiful design, below, to register to attend this year’s Annual Meeting of the Community Foundation – our 40th year!

Scholarship Application Season Runs Through March 7

The Outer Banks Community Foundation is now accepting scholarship applications on its website: www.obcf.org. The application deadline is 11:59 pm, Monday, March 7, 2022.

Instructional videos in English and Spanish are below this post.

The Community Foundation manages 60 different scholarship programs and expects to award about $200,000 to local students this year. Graduating high school seniors from Dare County, Currituck County, and Ocracoke are eligible to apply online. Non-traditional students also are eligible to apply for several scholarships, through our partnership with College of the Albemarle. Scholarships range from one-time awards of $1,000, to four-year awards totaling $24,000.

“We have scholarships for a huge diversity of students,” said Chris Sawin, President and CEO of the Community Foundation. “Art majors, nurses, firefighters, journalism students, tennis players, math majors, law enforcement majors, community college and vocational students — all are encouraged to apply. Thanks to two new funds established in 2021, students leaving community college to continue their education toward a bachelor’s degree are also now eligible to apply for scholarship funding.”

Applicants begin the process at www.obcf.org, which has a link to the Community Foundation’s online scholarship portal and instructional videos in English and Spanish. There is one application for all scholarships, for all high school seniors,  returning students, and Dare Guarantee graduates.

Though many of the Community Foundation’s scholarships are merit-based, the majority of awards consider financial need. For the need-based awards, students are required to complete a FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) and upload the resulting Student Aid Report into their application. Students whose citizenship status prevents their completion of a FAFSA (e.g., DACA students) may still be considered for need-based awards and should talk to their guidance counselors for instruction and/or assistance.

“We encourage students to begin the application process early,” said Nandy Stuart, Community Foundation Scholarship Administrator. “Applications MUST be received before midnight on March 7. Students who begin the process late risk not having their Student Aid Report and necessary recommendation letters in time. Students who miss the deadline, even if it’s just by a few minutes, are unfortunately not eligible for any scholarships we manage in 2022.”

The Community Foundation partners with College of The Albemarle (COA) Foundation and the COA Workforce Development and Readiness program to offer additional, diverse vocational and continuing education scholarships, including graduating high school seniors and adults of all ages and backgrounds. Interested students should visit COA’s website for more information and to apply for these college-specific awards.

New this year are two renewable scholarship funds, the R. Wayne Grey Memorial Scholarship and the Hanft McDevitt Family Scholarship, that are both designed to help community college graduates who wish to continue their education toward a four-year degree. In addition, two new, renewable scholarship funds have been activated and will award their first scholarships this year—the Bill Jones Memorial Scholarship, for NC State-bound students, and the Barbara Barnes Sherman Memorial Scholarship, for Dare County students.

Scholarship funds have been generously donated from individuals, families, businesses, nonprofits, civic groups, and government agencies to help local students pursue higher education. The list of scholarship programs can be seen here. Any community member can establish a scholarship fund with the Community Foundation by calling us at 252-261-8839.

All senior high school scholarship recipients will be announced at their schools’ Senior Awards Night in April and May.

 

 

Community Foundation Awards Multi-Year Grant to Outer Banks Hospital Outpatient Cancer Center

Outer Banks Community Foundation has awarded a multi-year, capital grant of $250,000 to support construction of the world-class Outpatient Cancer Center at the Outer Banks Hospital. The 15,000-square-foot state-of-the-art center will co-locate all of the hospital’s cancer services under one roof to provide compassionate, coordinated, and innovative cancer care to the Outer Banks community and surrounding regions.

“This grant to the Outer Banks Hospital Cancer Center reflects the type of investment that our founders and early donors envisioned when the Community Foundation was established forty years ago,” said Community Foundation President and CEO Chris Sawin. “Since 1982, investments made to the Community Fund and other funds continue to build our capacity to be involved in our region’s most pressing projects, causes, and opportunities. We invite our family of donors to join us in this effort.”

The 2019 Dare County Community Health Needs Assessment demonstrated that cancer is the leading cause of death in Dare County, a harsh reality for our small community. Since 2014, The Outer Banks Hospital has been focused on elevating cancer care services and is one of a small number of hospitals with 25 beds or less to have achieved an accredited cancer program through the Commission on Cancer. The goal with this new cancer center is to continue to improve the quality of life and experience for patients and caregivers who are facing the uncertainties that come with a cancer diagnosis.

“The Community Foundation is a tremendous partner and this contribution will make a lasting impact on the lives of those who require and deserve tightly coordinated cancer services in one convenient location,” said Ronnie Sloan, FACHE, president of The Outer Banks Hospital. “This greathearted commitment puts us over the halfway point in our capital campaign and we celebrate that achievement,” noted Sloan. “Still, we know that it will require hard work and the support of our entire community to cross the finish line.”

If you would like to contribute to a new fund that has been established to support our commitment to the new Cancer Center, use our online donation form and select or search for “OB Hospital Cancer Center Fund” from the drop down menu, or mail a check with “Cancer Center Fund” in the memo line. Thank you.

Community Foundation Now Accepting Grant Applications

The Outer Banks Community Foundation is now accepting applications from nonprofits for its quarterly Community Enrichment Grants Program. Applications must be submitted online via the Community Foundation’s web portal at www.obcf.org. The first deadline of the year is Friday, January 28 at midnight.

The Community Enrichment Grants Program is the Community Foundation’s largest and broadest funding opportunity; these grants are offered on a competitive basis for any kind of charitable project that benefits the Outer Banks, or any part thereof. Areas of interest include: arts & culture; animal welfare; children & youth; education; the environment; health; historic interpretation & preservation; and other human services.

Most Community Enrichment Grants will support the direct costs of a charitable project or program. . In 2021, for example, the Community Foundation sponsored Food For Thought’s Grocery Store Gift Cards for Students in Need, exhibit upgrades for Frisco Native American Museum & Natural History Center, and Trap-Neuter-Release (TNR) clinics for Friends of Felines-Hatteras and Feline Hope Animal Shelter.

Community Enrichment Grants are also awarded for capacity-building projects, with a goal of enhancing a nonprofit’s long-term effectiveness, financial stability, and/or program quality. For example, a grant was awarded last year for updating office equipment at Interfaith Community Outreach.

Additionally, the Community Foundation awards program scholarship grants, which are grants to enable a nonprofit to offer “scholarships” to individuals and families with financial need or other hardship. The scholarships offset the registration fees that the nonprofit would normally charge for any kind of enrichment program, such as an educational offering or after-school program. For example, a 2021 Community Enrichment grant provided scholarships for children with financial need to attend YMCA’s Camp Seaside summer camp.

Some limited Community Enrichment Grants are also available to nonprofits for program staff wages.

Community Enrichment Grants will be accepted on a rolling basis throughout 2022, and will be reviewed and awarded quarterly. Any applications received by Friday, January 28 will have a decision by March 10. Before starting an application for any grant, prospective applicants should first review the criteria online at www.obcf.org/grants, and then contact Chris Sawin at 252-261-8839 to discuss their project.

Hunting Family Fund Established at Outer Banks Community Foundation

A new fund has been created at the Outer Banks Community Foundation to support local charities that help residents on their journeys to better health. The Hunting Family Fund for Health and Wellness, recently established by Rich and Cindy Hunting, has a stated purpose to “support projects and organizations that promote health and wellness for people on the Outer Banks, with preference given to organizations or projects that serve the underinsured and/or uninsured, or that bring new health and wellness programs to the community.”

Health and wellness have been lifelong passions for Cindy. As a retired public health nurse professional, she spent a 43-year career promoting and protecting the health of communities in which she served. Rich also shares her passion; together, they decided to establish this new fund for the Outer Banks. They wrote, “We are glad that we can give back to a community that we love, for a cause we both are passionate about.”

Community Foundation President and CEO Chris Sawin said, “Only a handful of the more than 200 funds invested for our community at the Community Foundation have the specific purpose of improved health and wellness outcomes, and we’re thrilled that a new fund has been established to benefit residents in this way.”

Rich and Cindy, now retired, have been enjoying the Outer Banks for decades. Cindy used to come with her family as a small child and has happy memories of beach vacations in the 60s and 70s. Rich is an avid scuba diver from the great state of Maine; he moved to our region for work and soon found the wrecks off our shores perfect for his diving exploits. He partnered with friends and ran a dive operation here for several years, where they made friends and helped more divers get out to see historic wrecks up close and learn about our area’s unique and storied maritime history.

The Huntings have a vacation home in Nags Head, where they enjoy time at the beach with friends and family. The fund they’ve established at the Community Foundation is a field of interest fund, meaning that the Huntings have created a stated purpose for annual grants, and the annual granting decisions are left up to the Community Foundation board of directors.

Like most other Community Foundation funds, the Hunting Family Fund for Health and Wellness is endowed, meaning that the bulk of its assets will remain invested, and only 5% of the fund balance will be spent each year. In this way, the fund will be a perpetual source of support for charities meeting health and wellness needs on the Outer Banks.

Anyone may contribute to the Hunting Family Fund by sending a check to the Community Foundation with the fund name in the memo line, or by making a contribution online at obcf.org/donate-now, and selecting the fund from the searchable funds list.

The Outer Banks Community Foundation is a 501(c)3 nonprofit charitable organization that connects people who care with causes that matter. Based in a historic flat top cottage in Southern Shores, the Community Foundation manages more than $25 million across more than 200 charitable funds for individuals and agencies, awards grants to local nonprofits, administers 60 scholarship programs, and provides tailored services to help donors pursue their charitable interests. Since its inception in 1982, the Community Foundation has awarded more than $12 million in grants and scholarships to local nonprofits and students.

2022 Virtual Annual Meeting is 2.22.22

The Outer Banks Community Foundation Board of Directors cordially invites you to attend its 2022 virtual Annual Meeting on Tuesday, February 22 at noon.

We’ll celebrate 2021 community champions and outgoing board members, elect 2022 board members, and acknowledge 40 years of growing and giving, thanks to tireless, talented founders and decades of generous donors & volunteers, through a grateful Community Foundation, to hundreds of nonprofits here at home and throughout the US.

We hope you’ll join us virtually this year. Register for the virtual event via the button below

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Thank you! We look forward with pleasure to your participation.

 

Irene Nolan Memorial Scholarship Fund Established

Irene Nolan was a force for good for nearly two decades on our Outer Banks. She was an accomplished journalist and newspaper editor, an early board member for Hatteras Island Cancer Foundation, an enthusiastic volunteer for other causes, and a friend to many island residents.

The Irene Nolan Memorial Scholarship Fund was recently established by Irene’s long-time business partner and Island Free Press co-founder, Donna Barnett. Renewable college scholarships will be awarded in Irene’s name to students from Hatteras and Ocracoke islands, with preference given for students pursuing English-related degrees.

Irene moved to the southern Outer Banks in 1991 after a successful career at the Louisville, KY Courier-Journal. She moved to Hatteras in 1991 and married C.A. Boxley of Frisco. She became editor of the Island Breeze, a southern Outer Banks publication. 16 years later, Irene and Donna launched the Island Free Press (IFP), the first and only online newspaper to cover the southern Outer Banks. That publication quickly became an important community resource for visitors and residents.

“This has been a dream of mine since Irene’s untimely death in 2017,” said Barnett. “Irene was many things to me. A second mother, a mentor, a friend, and an icon. She was also a lot of things to this community, and was considered the voice of our islands. It was only fitting to start a scholarship in her name. I am so excited about this scholarship coming to fruition, and look forward to watching it grow and help more and more students through the coming years.”

“As one of many writers who were lucky to work with Irene at the Island Breeze and the Island Free Press, I can’t think of a better tribute to her legacy than to help the next wave of Outer Banks writers pursue their own love of journalism,” said Joy Crist, current editor of the Island Free Press. “Irene remains the soul and backbone of the IFP, and I’m beyond grateful to Donna and the Community Foundation for finding a beautiful way to shine a spotlight on an incredible journalist, editor, and friend.”

This fund, like most other Community Foundation scholarship funds, will offer up to four years of scholarship funding to each student recipient. In addition, the fund is endowed, meaning that the bulk of its assets will remain invested and only 5% of its earnings will be spent each year. In this way, the fund will be a perpetual source of scholarships for students from Hatteras and Ocracoke islands.

Anyone may contribute to the Irene Nolan Memorial Scholarship Fund by sending a check to the Community Foundation with the fund name in the memo line, or by making a contribution online at obcf.org/donate-now, and selecting the fund from the searchable funds list.